Tag Archives: email

Pet Peeves of a Meetup Leader

Most of our posts here focus on how you, as a group leader, can better run your Meetup or other community. I’m not one to complain normally, but I was recently having a conversation with Dante who runs several meetups under the umbrella Outdoor Club South (visit the Atlanta club here). We were chatting about some of our pet peeves as meetup leaders, so I thought I would vent a little. In no specific order:

  • Members emailing the organizer of a meetup and not mentioning the event they’re referring to. I get emails that say “Can I bring my dog to this hike” or “I’m not going to be able to make this event after all” with no mention of what event they are speaking of. We do an average of five events per week. Please, members, be specific about the meetup you’re talking about. It saves all the back and forth emails.
  • Members emailing me as the organizer about something that should instead go to the event host. Yes, I do say in my welcome emails and in my About Page that members can email me with any questions, but usually I have to forward on these questions to the event host himself. We’re pretty clear about who the host is for each event, so please save me a couple of minutes and contact him or her directly.
  • Members complaining about how many emails they receive. Hey, you can update your settings here and only get the emails that you want.
  • Members complaining that they didn’t receive notice about a new event posting. Did you turn your emails off? How would I let you know about a new event then?
  • Members complaining about an event that isn’t even ours. I know, most Meetup users are members of multiple groups and it might get confusing sometimes, but please make sure you’re referring to the right Meetup before complaining to a specific Meetup organizer.
  • Members complaining about an event or a park or a hike that they’re not even going to attend. A member once complained about how crowded a spot was and how overpriced the food was last time she visited that park. Is that really helpful?
  • No-shows on events that have an RSVP limit. Dante wrote about this here. I don’t care if you’re a no show on a social event, usually because the venue is very flexible and I don’t mind if we’re plus or minus ten percent on attendee count. It’s the limited event that we have to drive a couple hours to hike that I’m talking about.
  • Asking questions that are already answered in the event details. Please read every posting carefully before shooting off that email or posting your question on the event page.

What are your Meetup pet peeves, either as a member or leader? Let me know in the comments.

See Kelly Stewart’s Google+ profile.

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If you want to borrow my audience…

With running a meetup of over 4,500 members, I receive many requests to promote other organization’s events and fundraising initiatives. I get it. You want to borrow my audience.

Just keep several things in mind:

  • Your offer must be relevant to my audience.
  • Realize I have companies and organizations paying Nashville Hiking Meetup to be a sponsor. How would it look to give you free promotion? I’d be happy to send you a quote for becoming a sponsor.
  • If I decide to promote your efforts, make it easy on me by writing posts (email, Facebook, Twitter) in my voice and in the appropriate format. Don’t just attach a PDF press release that I have to extract content out of.

Questions?

See Kelly Stewart’s Google+ profile.

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Fluctuating member numbers in your meetup

One of the metrics I track with Nashville Hiking Meetup is member growth rate. Every so often I go into my Google spreadsheet I’ve set up and enter my current number of members and a calculation shows me my member growth rate per day. I also estimate when I’ll hit a certain member milestone; for example, I can say by 11/30/2011 I’ll have 4,000 members.

At one point in the past, our growth rate was about 5 members per day. Right now it’s hovering at about 2.5 new members added per day.

But recently that number has dropped.

Why? Meetup has reinstated a policy where inactive and lost members get automatically removed. The email I receive from Meetup says something like:

Gern Blansten has not visited Meetup and all of their emails have been returned as “undeliverable” for at least 6 consecutive months.

And I like it. Although larger member numbers are typically a good thing, inactives put a drain on the “system.” You want your ratio of active members to inactive members to be higher and higher. Often I get the question, “Well, you have 3,800 members but how many actually show up for events?” Pruning off the dead weight helps the active numbers increase.

Plus, from Meetup’s standpoint, the fewer dead emails they send to, the lower their costs. Email service providers charge by the emails sent, and even if the company is using an internal system to send mail, dead email addresses sap precious IT bandwidth.

At one point in the past, Meetup was automatically removing these ghost members but turned off that feature globally. I’m happy it’s back.

See Kelly Stewart’s Google+ profile.

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